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Full text of "Curryer"

Olfico of Alumni Relations 

Curry Coliege 

Milton, Mass. 02186 



CURRYER 1974 




CURRY COLLEGE 
MILTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
VOLUME XXIII 



1071 33u@ Hill Av&t9M# 
Mflton, WIA 021 a€ 




STAFF NOTE 

Etched on the following pages are the collective at- 
tempts of we, the Curryer staff, to present a comprehen- 
sive account of what life at the institution entails. To- 
day, more than at any time in the past ten years, a 
number of pertinent questions exist as to whether life at 
any college is worth the time and effort involved. In- 
deed, it is not unusual today for the college graduate to 
find himself in a much more difficult position than his 
counterpart who chose a different route upon graduat- 
ing from High School. Thus there would appear to be 
some merit in the high school graduate opting not to 
choose a college career. This change in attitude has of 
course had a significant effect on the welfare of the 
small college. Most of these institutions, if they haven't 
already closed down, find themselves in a state of fi- 
nancial crisis. Fortunately, at this point anyway, this in- 
stitution seems to be bearing up fairly well. Although 
enrollment is slightly on the wane, we have every 
reason to believe that this is merely a temporary set- 
back. Due to significant strides both on the academic 
and administrative sides, the college has evolved into 
an excellent choice for the prospective scholar. In 
keeping with the new Dean's (this is the administrative 
change to which we refer) philosophy of making the 
student's academic experience more meaningful, 
freshman colloquium was originated — enabling the 
student to avoid structured English and Psychology 
courses; the language requirement was abolished; and 
additional avenues in the category of equivalent educa- 
tion were made possible, thanks to the Dean, to whom, 
along with a retiring English professor, this year's Cur- 
ryer is dedicated. 

Indeed, at times in this day and age, with the possi- 
ble exception of the excutive branch of the federal gov- 
ernment, there would seem to be very little that is not 
in a state of economic crisis. It is this sort of thing that 
the graduating high school student must take into ac- 
count when choosing the right school. It is our belief 
that, all things considered, of the small liberal arts 
schools in the area, this institution offers most of what 
the student desires. Hopefully, the following pages will 
help to substantiate that opinion. 



DEDICATION 

In keeping with tradition, the Senior Class this year 
has been given the responsibility of choosing the per- 
son to whom the yearbook would pay tribute. We sus- 
pect that they have experienced this year more diffi- 
culty in selecting the proper individual than classes 
have experienced in the past. (Such a dilemma was not 
entirely unexpected in a year of such improvement in 
so many areas.) For this reason we are saluting not one 
but two persons. 

The first of these is an administrator who is unique in 
the history of the institution — the new Dean of the 
College, Dr. Frederick Kirschenmann. Dr. Kirschen- 
mann, originally from North Dakota, opted for Curry 
because he saw here an "opportunity for change". And 
change he has. In the short year that he has been here 
he has raised profound questions about the traditional 
philosophy of education. In his quest to humanize the 
academic area and develop more options for students, 
he has opened the door for easier use of equivalent 
education which allows the student to concentrate 
more heavily on field-work and independent study. 

He is also the person most responsible for the unpre- 
cedented abolition of academic tenure. This cessation 
of the practice of guaranteeing life time positions after 
seven years of employment marks the first such action 
of this type in an accredited college or university in the 
country. This is a remarkable achievement for a man in 
the first year of his Deanship. 

We applaud the action of this pioneer, and wish him 
success at the leading edge of education at Curry Col- 
lege. 

Our recognition of outstanding individuals would be 
incomplete if we failed to include Dr. Franklin Batdorf, 
whose career at Curry is closing in June, 1 974. Dr. Bat- 
dorf is a familiar and beloved figure on campus, dres- 
sed with the suited aplomb of an 18th century scholar 
and the sturdy shoes of a patient realist. In faculty meet- 
ings he has faithfully extracted rationality from lengthy 
proceedings. He has helped to establish the Curry Arts 
Journal, through which we can express ourselves crea- 
tively in poems, essays, short stories, drawings, and crit- 
ical analyses. 

Dr. Batdorf's cherubic face will, however, be most 
remembered for his well-structured, uniquely- 
fascinating classes in English. There we experienced his 
dedication, his absolute devotion to articulation and 
precision. In an oral age his insistence on excellence in 
writing well reminds us not only of our literary heritage 
but also of the true meaning of "communication". Long 
after the formal classroom sessions had ended he could 
be found, elbow to elbow with students in need of ad- 
ditional help. His unselfish giving of himself, his alive 
humor, and his timeless quality will always be with us. 
He will be missed. 






PART ONE 



PART TWO 



THE COLLEGE AS AN ENTITY 
A toal college community amounts to nothing 
without the shell of it's appearance. Curry is one 
of the more beautiful rural campuses in the Bos- 
ton area. A college is not a college without an 
administration and faculty. The following sec- 
tion exemplifies Curry College as a self- 
contained learning institute. 



THE STUDENT AS A PARTICIPANT 
In a college of 800 students it's important that 
the student not only go to class, but take an ac- 
tive part in his school. Whether it's the year- 
book, newspaper or radio station, there's plenty 
of excitement to be had. It's there for every stu- 
dent who wants it. This section shows the stu- 
dents involvement. 




PART THREE 



PART FOUR 



THE STUDENT AS AN ENTITY 
Curry is a four-year college. Like any other 
school of its kind, learning takes place in defi- 
nite steps. From your freshman year to your day 
of graduation you step the ladder to learning one 
step at a time. This section illustrates the student 
as an individual. 



PERRY SCHOOL 
For the past two years, Curry College has had 
Perry School on its grounds. Perry, which offers 
specialization in early childhood education, will 
not be with us next year. It will be incorporated 
into Curry. This section shows Perry School as a 
separate entity. 



PART ONE 




THE COLLEGE 

AS 
AN ENTITY 




EDITORS: 



William Reid 
Gail E. Fleischer 
Pat Sheridan 




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LOUIS R. LEVIN MEMORIAL LIBRARY 
DEDICATION 




LOUIS R. LEVIN MEMORIAL LIBRARY 










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DR. JOHN S. HAFER 
President of the College 



DR. HIRAM J. EVANS 

Vice President for Research and Lonj 

Range Planning 






DR. FREDERICK KIRCHENMANN 
Dean of the College 



JAMES G. SALVUCCI 

Assistant to the Dean of the College 



17 



DIVISION CHAIRPERSONS 




Dr. C. Alan Anderson 
HUMANITIES 



Dr. Robert L. Keighton 
SOCIAL SCIENCES 



Dr. William L. Mayo 
EDUCATION 



18 




Dr. Carl J. Cooper 
BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES 



Dr. Frances M. Kohak 
LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 



Dr. John Hovorka 
SCIENCE 



19 





Row I 

Dr. Albert Sherring 

Dr. Carl J. Cooper 

Patricia H. Fleming 

Ann P. Levin 

Row 2 

Dr. Gerald D. Hilyard 

Dr. John O. Gawne 

Not pictured 

Dr. Dante Germanotta 

Sally Merry 

Dean Manders 

Charles Settles 

Marian McDonald 

Dr. Marian Gustella 




DIVISION OF BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES 






Row I 

Dr. John H. Hahnfeld 

Dr. C. Alan Anderson 

Row 2 

Kathleen B. McCann 

Kenton K Steward 

Dr. William R. Pregeant 

Not pictured 

Marlene A. Lundvall 

Roger Allan 

Geroge C. Wharton 



DIVISION OF HUMANITIES 



23 





Row I 

Matthew A. Kook 

Dr. Hiram J. Evans 

Dr. John E. Tramondozzi 

Indar Kamal 

Dr. John Hovorka 

Not pictured 

David L. Fama 

Dr. Richard F. Kosh 

Dr. Rudloph W. Goetz 




DIVISION OF SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS 



24 



DIVISION OF EDUCATION 





Row I 

James G. Salvucci 

Gertrude M. Webb 

Row 2 

Carol Wadell 

Dr. Ellen P. O'Sullivan 

Not pictured 

Dr. John Coughlan 

Steven S. Howe 

Barbara Fluer 

Dr. William Mayo 

Barbara Schwartz 

Ann Russell 




25 



DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCES 



Left to Right 

First Row: 

Dr. Robert W. Garden 

Dr. Robert L. Keighton 

Dr. Pamela N. Wrinch 

Second Row: 

Judson M. Lyon 

Robert F. Capalbo 

Dr. John E. Hill 

Dr. Allan C. Creenberg 

Not Pictured: 

Dr. David E. Kidder 

Joseph K. Eckert 

William C. Roth 

Arthur N. Smith 









DIVISION OF LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 




Left to Right 

First Row: 

Edward H. Hastings 

Dr. Frances M. Kohak 

Dr. Gladys F.G. Martinez 

Patricia FJeitemeir 

Second Row: 

Dr. Alexander B. Moissiy 

Dr. Franklin P. Batdorf 

Dr. Marvin Mandell 

Dr. Joseph L. Schneider 

Not Pictured: 

Dr. Raul J. Artigas-Vidal 

Tamara S. Moissiy 

Claudine H. Hogarth 

Jonathan Hubbard 





27 




DEAN OF WOMEN 



Deirdre C. Kozlowski 



DEAN OF MEN 

Robert F. Capalbo 



HOUSE DIRECTORS 









Dick Ainsworth 
Nick Bramati 
Mary Jo Horner 
Debbie Hooper 
Karen McLaurIn 
Matt McNamara 
Jeff Michelson 
Joe Owens 

Mrs. Barbara Pettingill 
Linda Sutter 
Lenny Trapani 








Michael Stone 
Assistant Director 
of Development 



Dr. John O. Gawne 
Dean of Personnel Services 



Warren S. Bazirgan 
Director of Public Relations 



34 




Richard Mantz 
Dean of Admissions 



Thomas D. Goldrick 
Business Manager 



Donald S. McNeil 
Director of Development 





36 





37 







39 



PART TWO 




THE STUDENT 

AS 
A PARTICIPANT 




EDITORS: 



Robin Cohen 
Robert Perella 
Denis Campion 



What Can We Say? 





43 




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Homecoming weekend began 
with the appearance of banjo- 
wielding musicians strumming out 
tunes from both past and present. 
A few participants were at first 
skeptical, but most were involved 
in the unique sounds in no time. 

Saturday's events began with a 
motor parade including several 
floats, exhibiting the obvious artis- 
tic genius of those involved. (it's 
the thought that counts), and the 
nominees for homecoming queen. 
The gridiron confrontation with 
Nichols resulted in a disastrous 
30-0 defeat. Later that afternoon a 
joke-filled and suprise-ridden 
happy hour was held, featuring the 
antics of WRKO's Dale Dorman. 
Topping off the day's activities 
was a semi-formal dance. 




The Chateau de Ville set the stage for a fun-filled 
occasion. With a sudden burst of tears, the 1972 
queen, Dianna Cocuzza, surrendered her crown to 
Miss Nell McNeil, to the approval of all present. 
Also very popular was the bountiful buffet supper. 
The announcement an open bar, however, provided 
an excellent climax to an already perfect night. 



48 




What happens when a group of 
students and friends plan, toil, in- 
quire, and re-plan for a whole year to 
turn an old delapidated Activity Build- 
ing into a remodeled and reknowned 
nite-spot . . . "Coin' to the Pub?" 





51 




December 1973 marked the opening of Cur- 
ry's newest and most popular night spot. After a 
long and costly battle the Student Activity Build- 
ing, specializing in liquid beverages, opened its 
remodeled doors. Money was raised through a 
Telethon and the help of students, parents, ad- 
ministrators and various other friends of the col- 
lege. 

The Activity Building held a contest searching 
for the proper name for such an establishment 
and settled on "The Loose Caboose". 

The Curryer wishes to extend a special thanks 
to all involved for providing another alternative 
to long hours of studying. 




52 




54 



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Winter Weekend began with the 
happiest of happy hours, preparing 
students for the innovative sound of 
four banjo-pickers from way back 
when, who appeared at the North Ac. 
later that evening. The following night 
also featured sounds from the past in 
the form of "The Shittons." Students 
had this opportunity to retreat to the 
years of chino's, penny loafers and 
leathers, frolicking to those up-beat, 
really neat sounds of a happier time. 




59 




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Spring Weekend opened Friday April 27th, 
with a formal dinner dance at the Chateau de 
Ville. Dinner was served "family style" and 
we all learned the "Hully Gully". 



FIELD DAY 1974 





64 




65 



AWARDS NIGHT 1974 






The Fifth Annual Awards Night combined for the 
first time student leaders and Dean's List students. 
Honors were given to Nick Bramati, Male Resi- 
dent of the year; Laurie Fagelbaum, Female Resi- 
dent of the year; Teddy Kupferberg, Male Commu- 
ter of the year; Kathy Bunker, Female Commuter of 
the year for the second consecutive year; and the 
most coveted honor of Man Of The Year to Dean 
Robert Capalbo. 

Other awards winners were Sandy Rosen, C.A.S.; 
Rona Denis, L.D.; Ginny O'Leary, English; and Art 
Colella, Education. 

The Curryer extends its congratulations to all 
awards winners. 




68 



Spectators and Participants Alike Dig the Action 






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The Pressures 



Top L to R 

Thomas McEneny 

Karen Smith 

Jackie Cilmore 

Sue Danberg 

Joan Morrison 

Carolyn Kelley 

Ann Cohen 

Cynthia Cole 

Mary Weston 

Kenny Kupferberg 

Middle L to R 

Beth Verochi 

Sue Kupferberg 

Debbie Mulchman 

Sue Joel 

Doreen Reagan 

Bottom L to R 

Lenore Howard 

Sharon Levy 

Kathy Whitaker 

Joan Lonstein 

Pamela Case 

Fern Chartok 

Missing: 

Sue Grieco 






Exhaustion and jovialities . . . 






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73 



THE SADNESS OF DEFEAT . . . 






The Colonels entered the season with outstanding 
freshnnan and dreams of success, but the dreams 
popped and revealed the reality of a losing season, 
the first in three years. 



Curry 


6 


Maine Maritime 





Curry 





King's Point 


21 


Curry 


2 


Plymouth State 


8 


Curry 


27 


New Haven 


6 


Curry 


17 


Boston State 


17 


Curry 


20 


Albany State 


28 


Curry 





Nichols 


31 


Curry 


6 


Brockport 


31 


Curry 


10 


Bridgewater State 





Record 3-5-1 









75 



And the Feeling of things going right. 






The magnetism of competition reaches all . . . 





78 




The togetherness of a team, the 





feeling of a ball spinning through a hoop. 




The Curry five found the road to success for 
the first time in twelve years. The Colonels drib- 
bled and drove to twelve wins under rookie 
coach David Hussey. 

The Colonels suffer a loss that cannot be 
weighed . . . 1550 points and 800 rebounds 
chalked up by graduating senior Burnis De- 
Vaughn. We'll miss him. 



81 



And the Hope that the Dribbling Never Stops. 




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Curry 


80 


Bridgewater 


90 


Curry 


62 


S.M.U. 


82 


Curry 


63 


U.S. Coast Guard 


76 


Curry 


71 


New Hampshire 


106 


Curry 


91 


New England 


72 


Curry 


87 


Emerson 


78 


Curry 


52 


Roger Williams 


57 


Curry 


95 


Franklin Pierce 


74 


Curry 


88 


Fitchburg 


69 


Curry 


90 


New England 


68 


Curry 


93 


New FHampshire 


89 


Curry 


83 


St. Joseph's 


78 


Curry 


57 


Roger Williams 


89 


Curry 


80 


Hawthorne 


83 


Curry 


80 


Nichols 


67 


Curry 


87 


Franklin Pierce 


78 


Curry 


72 


Eastern Nazarene 


69 


Curry 


88 


Hawthorne 


94 


Curry 


88 


S.M.U. 


106 


Curry 


89 


Suffolk 


96 


Curry 


71 


Gordon 


70 


W-12 


L-9 







The Hockey Team Compiled An Amazing Record^ 





84 



Despite Pucking Around All Season. 



Curry 5 

Curry 5 

Curry 9 

Curry 7 

\^fry 6 
Curry 5 
Curry 6 
Curry 8 
Curry 12 
Cu rry 1 1 
Curry 7 
Curry 13 
Curry 4 
Curry 4 
Curry 




Mass Maritime 
Roger Wiiliam 
Quiney Jr 
St. Francis 
Stonehill 
Quiney Jr. 
Emerson 
Mass Maritime 
Chamber! in 
Assumption 12 
St. Francis 4 
Roger Williams 
Chamberlin 
Stonehill 
Assumption 
Worcester Poly Tech - forfeit 
RECORD 
,W L T 
Il4 2 1 



SjAi-J"!*™* x.»*: 




85 



The Colonels Gave The People A Lot To Talk 



The Baseball Team got back on the winning trail 
this season after a disappointing season last year. 
Led by the outstanding pitching of Randy Kohlen- 
berger, Bob Perella, Glenn Wilde, Dave Iverson, 
and the consistent play of Paul Levesque, Marty Bis- 
sonette, Rusty Russell, Bob Connelly, Rich Moran, 
Steve Cardinale, and Tom DeCabia, the Curry nine 
compiled a 12-5 record. Curry ended up second in 
the New England Intercollegiate Baseball Assn., 
only to be tapped by New England College. 

This enabled the team to participate in a tourna- 
ment, which was hosted by Franklin Pierce College. 
The three teams invited were, Curry, New England, 
and Nathahiel Hawthorne. The Colonels proved 
that they really were championship material by 
beating Franklin Pierce, in the first game and by 
sweeping the tournament by beating New England, 
in the second and final game. The prospects for next 
year are promising, as the majority of the team will 
return. The team will sorely miss the play of the 
graduating seniors, Steve Cardinale, and Bob Con- 
nelly. These two atheletes have brought the recogni- 
tion and the caliber of play to Curry baseball that it 
rightly deserves. 



86 




About ... A Championship. 




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88 



1974 TENNIS TEAM 




Andy Wrublin 
Steve Braverman 
Michael Mitchell 
Carl Sloan 
Steve Bernstein 
David Eagleton 
Ewing Butler 



A loaf of bread, a jug of wine 




and thou 





Better days are coming 



94 




96 





SKI CLUB 



1. John McAulliffe 

2. Alex Scarr 

3. Jon Pettengill 

4. Bill Reid 

5. Rick Blachard 

6. Sue Linowes 

7. Bill Clark 

8. Allyn Brand 

9. Dave O'Malley 

10. Lorraine Lupano 

1 1. Judy Cole 

12. Margie Cravelle 

13. Martha Cochrane 

Missing: Amir Homayomfeir, Frank Pouliot, 
Rick Peck, Wayne Horner, and Jim Spader 



98 




CHEERLEADERS 



1. Susan Greco 

2. Pat Baker 

3. Judy McKenna 

4. Kathy O'loughlin 

5. Pat North 

6. Pam Case 

7. Donna Nuzzo 

8. Doreen Regan 

9. Fran Clarke 





1. Dan Molloy 

2. Kathy Townsend 

3. Burnis De Vaughn (V.P. 

4. Gail Hubbel 

5. Carl Commuter 

6. James Beck 

7. Mike Frappier 

8. Bob Cox 

9. Charles King 

10. Kathy Bunker (Pres.) 

11. Steve Mechlinski (T.) 

12. John Simone (Sec.) 

13. Kirt Mansbach 




COMMUTER COUNCIL 



DROP-IN-CENTER 




1. Mark Snyder 

2. Michael Bernbach 

3. Joan Callanan 

4. Lionel Langlois 

5. Barbara Love 

6. Bill McClory 

7. Wendy Davidov 

8. Bill Nelson 

9. David Giguere 

10. Diane Dymtryk 

1 1. Michael Shaffer 

12. Dr. J. O. Gawne 

13. Dave Barachini 






M.D.C 



1. Jerry Bloch 

2. Robert Capalbo 

3. leff Michelson 

4. Sam Webb 

5. Steve Pickell 

6. Charlie Belnick 

7. Dave Cagliardi 

8. Jack Lemley 

9. Tom Kelso 

10. Dave Saltz 

11. Rick Peck 

12. Charlie Roux 

13. Mrs. Barbara Pettingill 

14. Kathy Whittaker 

15. Tony Searcy 

16. Ed Sperling 

17. Michael Reich 

18. Art Colella 

19. Joe Tenuta 

Missing: Jerry Fay, Tom Haugh, Jay Varga, Dave 
O'Malley, Matt McNamara and Roger Schneider. 



W.S.G.A. 



1 . Debra Morse 

2. Robin Vidgor 

3. Kathy Whitaker 

4. Eileen Dolan 

5. Nancee Chalifour 

6. Pat North 

7. Maisie Weston 

8. Kathy Wilson 

9. Sue Beresin 

10. Sue Damberg 

11. Laura Czajkowski 

12. Carol Kron 

13. Lisa Welling 

14. loan Morrison 

15. Kathy Rattigan 

16. Terrie Westbrook 

17. Karen Smith 

18. Buff Watson 
Missing: Debbie Lewis 





HILLEL 



1. Mike Stone 

2. Mark Gordon 

3. Robin Green 

4. David Arnold 

5. Bettina Weill 

6. Mark Snyder 
7. Matt Kook 

8. Maxine Nemerow 

9. Pam Dresher 

10. Marty Rosenkrantz 

1 1. Janis Stanowich 

12. Marsha Kamp 

13. Merit Friedman 

14. Sharon Kaye 

15. Charles Kolesky 






1. Tamara Moissiy 

2. Harold D. Brown 

3. Dr. Alexander Moissiy 

4. Patricia Sheridan 

5. Paul Artigas 

6. Rudolph Smith 

7. Dr. Albert Sherring 

8. Trevor Massiah 



INTERNATIONAL CLUB 



105 




Men Housing Staff 



1. Steve Cardinale 

2. |oe Tenuta 

3. Chris Neale 

4. Joe Owens 

5. Robert Capalbo 

6. Mrs. Barbara Pettingill 

7. Len Trapani 

8. Scott Crocott 

9. Mike Reich 
10. Steve McNeill 

Missing; Matt McNamara, Dick Ainsworth, 
John Dale, Nick Bramati, Jeff Michelson, Joe 
Grzelcyk. 





Womens Housing 
Staff 



1. Sue Joel 

2. Mary Jo Horner 

3. Robin Cohen 

4. Sandy Rosen 

5. Deirdre Kozlowski 

6. Paula Finegold 

7. Karen McLaurin 

8. Ramona Grey 

9. Nell McNeil 

10. Donna Nuzzo 

1 1. Terrie Westbrook 

Missing: Debbie Hooper, Linda Sutter, and 
Dianna Cocuzza. 




106 






B.S.U. 



1 . Leroy Mosley 

2. Gregory Robinson 

3. Janet Lee 

4. Mitchell Morris 

5. Terry Cook 

6. Fran Clarke 

7. Gene Deloatch 

8. Bernie DeVaughn 

9. Mona Grey 
10. Issac Rutledge 

Missing: Carol Bascomb, Harold Kelly, and 
Myra McKnight 



Although black students at Curry 
are in a very small minority, they 
have proved themselves more than 
able to fill the task of expressing a 
significant voice through the Black 
Student Union. Last fall's raffle for 
the benefit of side cell anemia vic- 
tims proved this by resulting in 
complete success. 





STUDENT 
SENATE 



1. Randy Kupferberg 

2. Debbie Davis 

3. Laurie Fagelbaum 

4. Dave Wallace 

5. Joe Tenuta 

6. Laurie Kolpan 

7. LeRoy Walker 

8. Pat Sheridan 

9. Dave Cagliardi 

1 0. Joyce Vogt 

11. Steve McNeil 

12. Joan Callanan 

13. Sue Linowes 

14. Bruce Shaw 

15. Debbie Hooper 

16. Robert McDonald 

17. John Dale 

18. DaveO'Malley 

19. Madge Postal 

20. Melanie Diraimo 





CURRY ARTS JOURNAL 



1. Mark Snyder 

2. Robin Vidgor 

3. Cindy Cole 

4. Dr. Franklin Batdorf 

5. Wendy Davidov 



CONCERT CHOIR 






1 . Lenore Howard 

2. Karen Anderson 

3. Maxine Nemerow 

4. Pat Sheridan 

5. Lucy Lulano 

6. Sue Damberg 

7. Doreen Regan 

8. Angela Ferrero 

9. Karen Benedict 

10. Jerry Fay 

11. Allyn Brand 



12. Steve Pickell 

13. Ned Smith 

14. Chris Markwell 

15. Maisie Weston 

16. Jackie Bernard 

17. Ann Neufeld 

18. Donna Nuzzo 

19. Kathy Wilson 

20. Ram Case 

21. Ned Hastings 



Professor Hastings 



MADRIGAL SINGERS 






1. Barb Nenninger 

2. Kathy Wilson 

3. Ned Smith 

4. Pat Sheridan 

5. Maisie Weston 
Missing 

Tom DeLorme, Mona Grey, Jeff Norton, and Jeremy House. 



6. Maxine Nemerow 

7. Pam Case 

8. Jody Custin 

9. Karen Benedict 



Professor Steward 




W.V.A.C. 



1. Peter K. Sisley 12 

2. Pam Dresher 13 

3. Ron Hurst 14 

4. Art Collins 15 

5. Randy Kohlenberger 16 

6. Henry Frick 17 

7. Fred Bryden 18 

8. Kevin Brown 1 9 

9. Paul Kaschuluk 20 

10. Heidi C. Franke 21 

1 1. Mark Gordon 22 
Missing: Bob Cox, John Simone, 
Ewing Butler, Ron Kozloff, Denn 
Everett Silver, Doug Eriich. 



Mike Matthev^/s 
Jeff Naumann 
Pat Morrison 
John Natelle 
Ed Fay 
Sandy Rosen 
Edward B. Smith 
Jeff Lowe 
Glenn Wilde 
Bruce Shaw 
Ed Barks 

Ed Ferguson, Bruce Beach, 
is Roach, Doninic Romano, 




This marked the last year that 
the campus radio station would 
broadcast from its A.M. 640 
spot. Permission was finally 
granted from the F.C.C. for new 
call letters, W.M.L.N., and to 
operate on F.M. 91.5, com- 
mencing in the school year '74 
and '75. This will be a welcome 
and well-deserved change for 
the rapdily-developing and al- 
ways versatile station. 









Christopher Bishop (1.) and Dr. Michael Dreyfus from the 
group "McKendree Spring" made a visit to W.V.A.C. last 
fall and left us with this reminder. 



Mr. Jack Hobbs and Mr. Roger Allen from 
W.R.K.O. in Boston serve as advisors to 
the W.V.A.C, staff. 



113 



I.T.A.C. PRESENTS "MAME 



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CURRIER-TIMES 





1. Robin Roll 6. Bob Dacey 

2. Mark Snyder 7. Sandy Chait 

3. Joe Schneider 8. Art Collins 

4. Roz Strauss 9. John Dale 

5. Norman Shink 
Missing 

Bill Crable, Mark Lenson, Debbie Davis, Sandy Vogel, Robin Vigdor, 

Cindy Cole, Mark Iverson, Ginny O'Leary, Scot Wilson, and Neal Pol- 
lack. 



r 




Returning Editor — Norman Shink 







1974-1975 Editor — John Dale 




^'<\^^^^^^^^ 







CURRYER STAFF 



1. Bruce Tegrin 

2. Doreen Regan 

3. Donna Nuzzo 

4. Ron Kozloff 

5. Karen Smith 

6. Gail Fleischer (Assistant Editor) 

7. Mark Snyder 

8. Pat Sheridan (Associative Editor) 

9. Robin Cohen 

10. Randy Kohlenberger 

n. William Reid (Editor-in-chief) 

12. Bob Perella 

13. Denis Campion 
Missing 

Kathy Cassidy, Tom Kelso, Scott Gillet, Carolyne Kelly, William Grable, 
Neal Pollack, Scott Wilson, David Arnold, David O'Malley, David 
Giguere, and William Spalty. 




119 



PART THREE 




The Student 

As 

An Entity 



120 




EDITORS: 



SENIOR SECTION; 
Neal Pollack 



Ron Kozloff 
Mark Snyder 
Donna Nuzzo 
Doreen Regan 



121 



FRESHMAN CLASS 




The Freshman class started the year off with 
enthusiasm never seen before on the campus. 
Lead by Melanie DiRaimo, as President and 
Sandy Chait, as Vice-President, they sponsored 
an all night movie marathon. Pam Dresher, as 
Secretary and Ann Fiedler, as Treasurer, finished 
up the team making the year unforgettable. 



The class of 1976 had 

outstanding leadership this 

year. President David 

O'Malley, Vice-President 

Mark Snyder, Senators Bill 

Clark, Stephen McNeil, Sue 

Linowes and Secretary 

Chuck Falcone (see photo 

above) gave the class the 

momentum they needed for 

their sophomore year. Not 

pictured Treasurer Dave 

Wallace. 





SOPHOMORE CLASS 




125 



JUNIOR CLASS 



The class of '75 en- 
joyed one of it's most 
active years this past 
two semesters. They 
showed class spirit and 
participation in sponsor- 
ing a happy hour and 
raffle. President Joe 
Tenuta and Vice- 
President Doreen Re- 
gan, in addition to Sec- 
retary Donna Nuzzo 
and Treasurer Debbie 
Davis, sparked the class 
this year. 







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126 



Nicholas E. Bramati 
Kathleen M. Bunker 
Alfred F. Calabretta 
Arthur J. Colella 
CI if fa rd B. Gratz 
Deborah M. Hooper 
Randy Kupferberg 
Donna M. Nuzze 
Michael D. Reich 
Patricia J. Sheridan 
Karen W. Smith 
Shelley G. Swartz 




WHO'S WHO 




129 





Patricia M. Asaro 





Pamela R. Becker 



Nancy A. Bellino 



Nicholas E. Bramati 




Kathleen M. Bunker 



Craig A. Burton 




Daniel F. Cahill Alfred F. Calabretta Jr. Steven W. Cardinale 




132 




Steven T. Centore 



Robert Chaput 



Dianna M. Cocuzza 




Robert H. Connelly 



133 




Judith A. Corey 



Regina Cronan 



James F. Defillipo 




Rona R. Denis 



Peter D. Dervan 



Richard A. Dillof 



134 




Robert H. Ellis 



Kevin L. Ellsworth 




Laurie S. Fagelbaum Gail E. Fleischer Michael E. Flynn 





Dona E. Friedland 



Barbara S. Garner 



Roni S. Goodman 




Linda J. Hahon Cynthia C. Halsey 



137 




Virginia A. Handfield 



Deborah M. Hooper 



Jeffrey L. Horton 




Martha L. Hunt 



138 




Timothy P. Jackson 



Suzanne loel 



John P. Jones 




Barry E. Karlin 



139 




Charles J. Koletsky 



Randy Kupferberg 



Mark Lenson 




Robert B. Lubell 



Joseph P. Luongo 




Ronald J. Magnetti 




Beverly McLean 



Nell C. McNeil 




William R. Meara 



Donald R. Medeiros 



Eileen Mehaffey 





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Jeffery G. Mich el son 



Irene L. Moy 



William G. Nagle Jr. 




Vincent P. Occhiuti 



143 




Charles A. O'Connell 



Virginia A. O'Leary Kathleen A. O'Loughlin 





Taj A. Oluwa 




Linda S. Pagliaro 




Janet Pearson 



Suzanne P. Perel 



Chris J. Plakias 




Michael D. Reich 




Sandra D. Rosen Michele R. Rothberg Michael L. Sandoval 





Susan L. Sandoval Louis A. Santomarco Susan W. Seilhamer 





Donald A. Shemnitz 



Luis M. Silva 



147 




Barry L. Sneider Meredith A. Spencer Leslie S. Steele 





Mary Ann Stewart William T. Summers Shelley G. Swartz 




Patricia A. Tzannos Laurie L. Olshuff 



149 




Jane E. Van Haur Carol R. Wasson Linda D. Waterman 





Samuel L. Webb 




Robert M. Weber 



150 




Katherine I. Whitaker 



Eleanore L. Wilder 



Bethany A. Young 




Marjorie E. Zoll 




Sydney A. Rose 



Leroy L. Walker III 





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Paula M. Linsky 




Michael S. Bernbach 



Allen P. Reardon 




Carolyn A. Kelley 



Michael D. Shaffer 



Denise Redmond 





Lionel W. Langlois 




Joyce L. Vogt 




I 





After four wild years at Curry, the 
final Senior Week was no exception, 
we really did ourselves in. There were 
a series of parties and good times we 
will all remember, beginning with the 
cookout and student-faculty softball 
game. Then we treked to President 
Hafer's house where we were plied 
with liquor and sent on to the Dinner 
Dance at the Drapkin Center. Finally 
we dragged our tired bodies to the 
cafeteria to be revived somewhat by 
the Senior Breakfast, then herded on 
to rehersal and the dedication of the 
W. George Kennedy Academic Center 
and Wallace B. Foard Auditorium. 
After all this, we proceeded to prepare 
ourselves by whatever means possible 
for "The Big Day". 



CLASS OF 1 974 





Commencement exercises for the Class 
of 1974 took place Sunday, May 19. The 
day was beautiful, a perfect way to end 4 
years of hard work. Anticipation grew on 
the preceeding days as the tents and 
chairs were set up and the lawns were 
manicured to the likeness of a golf 
course. 

Slowly, a full hour before the exercises 
were to begin, the spectators seats began 
filling up with relatives and friends of the 
graduates. We were honored with the 
presents of Chief S.B. Ajasa Oluwa, Chief 
of Lagos State, Nigeria who was present 
for his son's graduation. 

The Commencement Address was gi- 
ven by the Honorable Margaret Heckler, 
member of Congress, Tenth district of 
Massachusetts. Representative Heckler 
also received an honorary Doctor of Laws 



degree. 

Other honorary degrees were received 
by Lenice Ingram Bacon; Doctor of Let- 
ters, and Harold B. Van Gorder; Doctor 
of Business Administration. 




159 




Holding with tradition, the Class of 1974 pre- 
sented President Hafer with a gift for the school. The 
gift was in the form of money to be used for carpeting 
a new student-faculty lounge in the North Academic 
Building. Kathleen McCartin and La Verne Nolan 
were the class representatives. 

Clifford Cratz was given the honor of being class 
Orator and presented an inspiring speech before the 
audience. 

The 1974 New Era Award was confered by Joseph 
Ventrone, Class of 1971, and was received by 
Dianna M. Cocuzza. 



160 





Well folks, that's the 1974 Curryer. As I write 
this it's 5:30 p.m., May 29th, almost three weeks 
since the end of school and only three days until 
our last deadline. It's difficult to realize that all 
the time, effort, sweat and fun is over. It has really 
been an experience being editor of this book. It 
has really been a pain in the ass. If I were asked to 
do it again I wouldn't. The fact remains that I did 
do it and I'm kind of proud. There is alot of this 
book that is opinion . . . my opinion. I realize 
that a yearbook is not a vehicle for expressing 
opinion but it's hard to remain objective for very 
long when you're so deeply involved in some- 
thing. 



As I said earlier I'm proud of myself, but not 
half as proud as I am of my staff. You can't im- 
agine how inexperienced we were last Sep- 
tember. There's alot to a yearbook, alot of or- 
ganizing, alot of thinking and alot of just plain 
work. I would like to personally thank not only 
for myself but for the entire student body, all th- 
ose who contributed, whether it was photo's, 
copy, time, effort or just plain ideas. Special 
thanks to Gail Fleischer who never failed to give 
reassurance and sound advice when things got 
tough, to Pat Sheridan who will succeeding me 
next year, to Tom Kelso who again came through 
with an unprededented advertising campaign. 
Randy Kolhenberger our photography manager 
and Denis Campion whose eyes started to look 
like a 35mm lens after 12 hours straight in the 
dark room. Also Warren Bazirgan, our advisor 
and Dick Sweich, from Hunter Publishing Co. 

I hope we have succeeded at least to some 
degree in presenting Curry as you remember it. 
The biggest problem in creating a popular year- 
book is trying to satisfy the greatest amount of 
people. Well I didn't try. I tried to satisfy myself. I 
have. 

Well, my summer is about to begin so we'll be 
seeing ya, okay? 

William T. Reid 
Editor-in-Chief 
1974 Curryer 



PART FOUR 




PERRY SCHOOL 




STAFF: 



Patia Wheeler 
Diane Saved 
Kathy Spillane 
Christine Anchade 
Kathy Cassidy 
Carol Labo 
Terri Romano 



163 



FACULTY AND ADMINISTRATION 




Dean Priebe 
Dean of Students 



Dean Hermiston 
Academic Dean 




Mrs. Vinyl 
Secretary of the Deans 




Mrs. Renton 



Sister Pauline LaMothe 



Dr. Woofenden 




Mrs. Wax 




Mrs. White 



Mr. Walker 



Mr. McAlear 




Mrs. Horak 



Mrs. Stephens 



CLASS OFFICERS 





Top Left: Ray Eldridge, Terri Romano, Penny 
Pemberton, and Andrea Quinn. Top Right: Laura 
Gibbs and Joan Callanan. Bottom: Janet Klein and 
Pat Fields. 




170 




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PERRY SCHOOL 




DAY CARE CENTER 




1974 KINDERGARDEN 



^ Li^it^riiiMJ 




CONFERENCE 




175 



MESSAGE FROM PRESIDENT PERRY 

The Boards of Trustees of Curry College and the Perry School have 
agreed that It is In the best interest of both schools to integrate totally 
the Perry program of Early Childhood Education into the Curry Col- 
lege division of Bahavioral Sciences next fall. The Perry philosophy 
as it has been known will be implemented and continued in the new 
Perry Early Childhood Center. 

Curry will be enriched by the addition of this major area of con- 
centration to its educational program in several ways, including a 
new student-teacher association with some 150 schools with which 
Perry has had an active working relationship over the years. The 
Curry student body will be enlarged which, of course, places it in a 
stronger financial position to compete in the world of private col- 
leges. Curry can look forward to the continuing sense of loyalty that 
you have always expressed in the past for Perry. 

The advantages to Perry are many. From a financial point of view, 
it is an absolute necessity. Educationally, the Perry program will be 
continued and broadened within the framework of a highly- 
specialized major. While we were pleased to have our students re- 
ceived Massachusetts Teacher Certification, now we are delighted to 
have them obtain the baccalaureate degree without transfer. We trust, 
also, that the integration of our students into the Curry community 
will result in a strengthened loyalty and unity of purpose. 

While Mrs. Perry and I will no longer be involved in the direct 
administration of the School, there will be representation on the 
Curry Board. More importantly, however, our interest in every one of 
you will always be with us throughout the coming years. We turn to 
each of you for your help in making the period of transition as 
smooth as possible. 





In the tradition of Perry School, the student 
body worked together to sponsor Parents 
Night. 

This food-filled and fun-filled evening will 
be talked about for years to come. 




180 



CHILDREN'S THEATRE PRESENTS . . . CINDERELLA 




V 



Children's Theatre at Perry produced an original 
version of Cinderella. Along with Mrs. M. White, 
Director, the cast traveled to five local elemen- 
tary schools, bringing happiness to it's viewers. 

CAST 
Cinderella: Martha Simollari 
Prince: Scott Gil let 
Duke: Tony Brown 
Queen: Nancee Chalifour 
Prime Minister: Laura Gibbs 
Step Mother: Carol Forbes 
Mattilda: Linda Holbrook 
Grizelda: Laura Gibbs 
Frump: Janet Brown 

Lady I: Ricki Sumberg-Lord: Helen McDonald 
Lady II: Judy Joy 

Lady III: Joan Callanan-Lord: Barbara Dawood 
Godmother: Lisa Shapiro 
Crew: Jo-Anne Crowley, Judy Gordon, Helen 
McDonald, Judy Joy, Ricki Sumberg, Joan 
Callanan 

Assistant Director: Pat Field 
Accompanist: Abby Keaveny 
Choreographer: Nancee Chalifour 



182 





183 





"I enjoyed the play all the acctesses where very 

good and the clothe were butiful." 

"The one with the funny hair looked like my 

baby sitter." 

"The funnyest was when the step sisters popped 

out and screamed at Cinderella." 

"If you do it to another school they will like It, I 

know." 

— Exerpts from children's thank-you letters — 



185 





187 




Editor's Message 
This section of the "Curryer" has been an attempt by myself 
and my staff to portray the closeness and togetherness that the 
Perry students have. 

I would like to thank my staff members for "sticking around 
and doing their job" when it had to be done. 

Lastly I would like to thank Bill Reid and Gail Fleischer for 
spending many hours helping me do my section. 

Thank you all 



Kathleen Cassidy 
Perry Section Editor 



IN MEMORIAM 
1899- 1974 « 














MR. ISADORE BROMFIELD 



BOOSTERS 



Emile N. Bernard 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert O.F. Bixby 

Wilmor Brewer 

Mr. & Mrs. Morris Carsons 

David & Barbara Davis 

Mr. & Mrs. R.F. Ellsworth 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Flynn 

Mr. & Mrs. Werner P. Franke 

Lillian Hawie 

Mary A. Hennessey 

Mrs. George E. Kelly 

David Lewis 

Mr. & Mrs. David F. Linowes 



FHarry A. Mallon 

Lt. Col. & Mrs. George C. McCleary 

Mrs. William M. Morcom 

Mr. & Mrs. Ernest M. Namerow 

Mr. & Mrs. C.L. Nenninger 

Jessie W. Pearson 

Mr. & Mrs. John P. Regan 

Mr. & Mrs. Macey H. Rosenthal 

Mr. & Mrs. Sidney P. Roth 

Mr. & Mrs. Frank Santonello 

Mr. & Mrs. Seymour M. Sperling 

Frederick & Dorothy Wilde 

Gerald J. Zinberg 



190 



SPONSORS 



Mr. and Mrs. George F. Brady 

John and Ann Brady 

Mr. and Mrs. W.J. Butryn 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Colella 

Mr. and Mrs. Frederich H. Corey 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward W. Gotten 

David and Joanna Cox 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael M. DeFillipo 

Allan L. DesRosiers '62 

Mr. and Mrs. Russell J. Duca 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Ellis Sr. and Family 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael Field 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. hiaggerty 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry N. Handfield 

Marc A. FHarris '71 

Mr. and Mrs. John F. Hayes 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph H. Healey 

Mr. and Mrs. John F. Holly 

Mr. and Mrs. William E. Jackson Jr. 

Gloria Kiken 

lan-Tamar and Jeffrey Kops 



Edmund and Suzanne Kruger 

Herbert R. Kusche 

Dr. and Mrs. Heinz J. Lorge 

Mr. and Mrs. William F. Meara Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. William J. Morrow 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis Nugent 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank S. Owen 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Phillips 

Paul Plakias 

Mr. and Mrs. John W. Roche 

Francis and Emma Ragusan 

Mr. and Mrs. A.M. Salomon 

Dr. and Mrs. Scheig 

Harry P. Schoenberg 

Irving Schoenfeld 

Warner and Amely Smith 

Dan and Maxine Snyder 

Mr. and Mrs. William T. Summers 

Mr. and Mrs. William A. Verrochi 

Olga Young 



191 



PATRONS 

Edward J. Dervan 

Mr. & Mrs. Salvatore Falcone 

Mr. & Mrs. Laszio Fleischer 

Tim Garvey 

Capt. & Mrs. John D. Kidd 

Mr. & Mrs. Edward L. Lupano 

Austin C. McLean 

Regena O'Neill 

Mr. & Mrs. Julian Rashkind 

Mr. & Mrs. Sani Rothberg 

Mr. & Mrs. Arthur Sneider 

Michael Young 

Mr. & Mrs. Saul Zang 



SPECIAL PATRONS 

Mr. & Mrs. Williams W. Brett 

In memory of Irene Brunner 

Dr. & Mrs. Milton Farber 

John F. Gallagher Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles D. Grable 

David Iverson 

Mr. & Mrs. John B. Kelley 

Mrs. Howard R. Kelso 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles J. McClory 

William F. Patterson 

Robert A. Raeburn 

Mr. & Mrs. Paul Rizzotto 

Edward J. Slotkin 

Mr. & Mrs. N.C. Weiss 



193 



TEWKSBURY SEWER 

SERVICE 

Tewksbury, Massachusetts 



STAR DISTRICT 
Boston, Massachusetts 



DAVIS SPORTSWEAR CO. 
Lawrence, Massachusetts 




^^— 



NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS FOOTBALL CLUB 



194 



WALTHAM SUPER MARKET 
Waltham, Massachusetts 



WALTHAM MEAT SHOP INC 
Waltham, Massachusetts 



195 



PEGGY LAWTON KITCHENS, INC 
East Walpole, Massachusetts 



EVERETT SQUARE SPORTING GOODS 
Everett, Massachusetts 



COMMONWEALTH LOCK 
Commonwealth, Massachusetts 




BRUSH HILL 

TRANSPORTATION CO 

Dorchester, Massachusetts 




MERRICK, N.Y. 

I.CC. MC 135129 



WOLLASTON CREDIT UNION 
Wollaston, Massachusetts 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



A. J. WNE ^ CO. 



1 500 Worcester Road 

Framingham, Mass. 01701 

(617)879-3600 



BUILDERS & DEVELOPERS OF: 

Old Colony Village Condominium 
in Orleans on Cape Cod 

Chapel Hill Apartments & Condominium 
in Framingham, Mass. 

Fountainhead Apartments 
in Westborough, Mass. 

And single family homes in 
the communities west of Boston. 



198 





Additional Booster; Deirdre C. Kozlowski 



199 




200